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Newspaper Archive of
Mukilteo Beacon
Mukilteo , Washington
Lyft
July 22, 1992     Mukilteo Beacon
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July 22, 1992
 

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2 - Mukilteo Beacon - July 221 1992 Welcome to the Beacon -- It's an honor to espouse here my commentaries on human behavior, of which I' m told I exhibit very little. That's easy to understand, since l'm from California, and the only behavior we've been known for recently is how to migrate north with inflated housing dollars and comldain about rain. I can assure you, however, the owners of this new publica- tion are serious about providing a professional community newspa- per, chock full of good and useful advertising and sound editorial judgment and balance -- except, of course, what you might read here. Mukilteo,I proudly tell friends, is "north of Seattle and south of Canada, and can be reached by ferry on the way to somewhere else." After I pronounce it several times to help them, I get excited describing the unique lighthouse, the fact that Harbour Pointe Golf Course was rated the numero uno new public course in America and the tranquillity of morning java at the Coffee Company when Spike is tame. When I describe the peaceful and resplendent setting here, they wonder how it's possible not to miss the action and excitement of Los Angeles. I explain the siren for the volunteer fire department goes off frequently at the 3rd Street station and police have more time to keep loose dogs off the street because the only gang wars are limited to anxious children waiting in cars to board the ferry. Driving is a breeze, I explain, as long as your tabs are cur- rent, you use turn signals, don't honk at rude drNers and don't throw cigarette butts out windows, items most Californians don't include in .... er reperrccn  Orvtng -srrs. ........ The political situation hinges on whether the Paine Field expansion is good for business and bad for housing prices and who is going to buy all the food in the new grocery stores going up near Harbour Pointe. Old Towners worry as much about Harbour Pointe residents requiring 32 traffic lights on the Speedway as they do about Californians buying speculative property. There is a flurry of new business in Mukilteo based on opti- mism the city will grow and prosper as it continues its venture into a diverse community of useful citizens (excluding this writer). The City Council labors over vital issues like where to house city hall, how to expend tax dollars and who should be in charge of whom and why and how it's going to get along with the Everett council and what's going to halJpen when the navy base is complete and how many more people the city can accommodate when Boeing com- pletes its expansion program. So here comes the Beacon, a local paper for local consump- tion. Serious issues will be discussed within its pages -- except here, where brain damage causes this writer to take nothing seriously except the espresso, pizza, video and grocery stores which continue to provide nourishment for irreverent observations. Gary Schwartz is a nationally-syndicated columnist and photographer, residing in Mukilteo. Residents fed up with Ja traffic, survey reveals as at Mukilteo residents list traf- fic, noise, burglaries and vandal- ism as the top four law enforce- ment problems facing the city, according to a survey released last week. The Mukilteo Police Department and Community Police Advisory Board distrib- uted the survey last spring, ask- ing residents to rate police ser- vices, and list perceived prob- lems and recommended improvements. Of 450 surveys randomly mailed, 156 were returned, said Chief Jon Waiters. Walters said police depart- ments across the country are striving to improve services. And, based on survey results, he said the Mukilteo department already is changing some of its practices. Emphasizing the drive for service to the community, Waiters said, "We want to be the Nordstrom of police depart- ments." Part of that effort entails the enlistment of the citizenry to help the police, through block watch groups, crime education and other programs. Earlier this year, the department hired full- time crime prevention coordina- tor Pat Cowan to develop those various programs. Waiters said police for too long have been glorified "fact fidefS" for tiirce cbmpa- nies. Following a burglary, for example, officers used to take a LITTLE ORCA LEARNING CENTER Full-time daycare available Exceptional pre-school program Fall enrollment available now for before and after school Kindergarten after school program Creative programs and activities Nutritious meal preparation Experienced care givers (formerly Rosehill Daycare) Police Beat A resident on the 6000 block of Central Drive reported vandals had egged his house and thrown a rock through a win- dow. There are no suspects. OQ A resident on the 9900 block of 50th PI. W. reported phone harassment by a neighbor who allegedly had called her son and made threatening remarks. The victim charged the caller had a phone illegally set up in the woods behind his house. got A resident on the 1000 block of 1st St. reported his 1982 Toyota had been broken into twice and the rear window broken during a one week peri- & report, send a copy to the insur- ance firm and move on to the next assignment. Now, they help citizens learn how to avoid being future victims. "We want our police to be crime prevention officers," Walters said. "So after we take the facts, we take the next 30 minutes to go over with you how to avoid this in the future." Craig Standlee, chairman of the police advisory board, said that nine-member citizens group also is actively working to involve residents in crime pre- vention. "If we have 22 officers or 30 officers it doesn't really make a difference, because we can have 30,000 eyes in the community," Standlee said. While the survey generally showed residents were pleased with police services in Mukilteo, it also demonstrated the depart- ment had failed to adequately educate the public about all of the services that are available, including home checks when residents are on vacation. And, while big city prob- lems such as gangs or prostitu- tion don't exist here, survey respondents indicated they still want improvements in areas that are problems. Traffic -- speed- ing and volume -- topped the list. Waiters said the police are stretched too thin to focus on od. Oo A stereo, a wallet contain- ing $100 cash and a Visa card were reported stolen by a resi- dent on the 4800 block of 76th St. SW. Unknown suspects broke into the parked car and later discarded the wallet, which was found on the 8600 block of SR 525. ooo A business on the 8200 block Of 44th Ave. W reported six checks had been stolen earli- er in the month. The caller sus- pected a woman who had been in the office asking for a job application. One of the checks, made out for $150, had been cashed by a woman fitting the suspect's description. oo An investigator talked with two boys at a home on the 5300 block of Harbour Pointe Blvd. after an anonymous caller alleged they were child abuse victims. The investigator found the boys "healthy and happy." Their mother said she had been fighting with her sister and sus- pected the sister may have made the call. gO An Everett man was arrest- ed at Mukilteo State Park during the early morning hours after officers responding to a fire- works report found him in the closed park. Officers ran a check on the suspect and found he was wanted on an outstand- ing traffic warrant. H , . traffic, but he hopes to hire full-time traffic officer next ye Lo And again, he'll be enlistii person residents to help, in this ca belong with the use of a radar speed si  boards that will be placed in vario when s neighborhoods. A radar g on the tracks an approaching car speed and the sign flashes t Bt number. Counc Participating residents wt when l observe speeders will be asked Jackso report license numbers, and t anothe police will send a warning to rd Schedt vehicle's registered owner, the W "The value of this go Repree along with our philosophy Distrk Waiters said. "We can't be R1 every comer, so we'll give y Jacksc the means to help us." A complete copy of the su Repul: vey results can be obtained at tl Beck police department. Among tt Demo highlights: If Traffic is the number o Jacksc concern, followed in order  Coum noise, burglary and vandalism, term. The majority of respo dents feel their neighborhooi lenge ae "low" crime rate areas; nor "But 1 said they lived in a "high" crirl live a rate area. Respondents ing, b indicated of] cer should be held strict accountable for their own pr0fe ular i sional behavior, the le . The DARE progra F should be a department priori[ vice l and more attention should t the S: paid to block watch progra Adv and child/pedestrian safety edt cation. OOO A Mukilteo man was arrested after police responded to a domestic violence call on the 4700 block of 44th St. The suspect allegedly had showed up at the home intoxicated and turned violent in an argument with the woman there. city' lowi Responding to an arson at report, officers found the seat of Cou a steam roller o:d'fire at a con- offi, struction site at 13500 42nd the Ave. W. The seat and steering Spel wheel were destroyed. Stat, ing A Freeland man threatened ly to take a valve wrench to the wifl headlights of a rented car after the driver cut in the ferry line on deg SR 525. The driver, from nau Sanborn, Nev., said he was hay unfamiliar with the system. He declined to press charges. offi coo Sul A Mukilteo restaurant of: employee accused a Silver Lake m.a, man of assault at an apartment on the 5200 block of 84th St. SW after the suspect allegedly grabbed the victim's shirt and pulled a knife on her. He also t challenged a friend of the victim to a fight before acquaintances pulled the assailant away and left with him. There were no injuries. t open, SR5: place anne: Jack, there